Pre-apocalyptic angst

I read somewhere the other day, that for many these are ‘pre-apocalyptic times’.

As several fellow practitioners shared at the Body-Centred Practitioners Network Gathering this November, I too am witnessing a lot more anxiety-ridden individuals coming to me. This is also true in my role as an acupuncturist at the Brighton Community Acupuncture Clinic, pay-as-you-can-afford practice, which attracts many who are vulnerable to financial hardship and consequently psychological distress.

Throughout my 30 years-plus career, till this year, I would say an 25% of clients were coming for anxiety and depression. Since about 9 months ago that has jumped to a phenomenal two-thirds of all my new clients. So a ‘pre-apocalyptic’ time is indeed what many are perceiving; and some would say with good reason too.

How that is impacting on me is that it confirms my version of reality, which says it is  ‘all is not well’ and possibly ‘going to pot’. As a veteran of the 70s counter-culture I am definitely of the opinion that things are coming home to roost. Greed, exploitation and indifference inevitably also lead to the ‘dark side’.

I do though agree that the most radical and ‘revolutionary’ thing we can do right now is this thing called spiritual therapy and psychological healing. For me, it is an absolutely integral part of life, to have someone/s to go to for support, to lend an ear, be there for you, give you some insight and assistance to access your inner resources.

It is no coincidence I call what I do, this particular synthesis of humanistic, body-centered, and spiritual courses, trainings and apprenticeships, Integral Core Therapy.

What we do in our life, including what we term ‘work’, must be integral to the rest of our life, to what we love and to who we are. The older I get and the longer I work with people, the more connected and integrated my ‘work’ feels to the rest of my outer worldly and inner spiritual life. That is how I always intended it to be, so I’m gladdened this is the case.

‘Being with’ your integral self

It is only really possible to receive comfort and healing in life from others or spirit if you have worked through the egoic personality’s unconscious reactivity to events and challenges. You need to get through the rage, panic, hate and other existential emotional responses to be able to feel the love there is both within and without you. Hence why in Integral Core Therapy there’s a progressive integration to working with the physical-vital, the emotional-psychological and integral-spiritual levels, with each building on the others.

‘Being with’ your integral self, your spirit in effect, is the essence of the work I do on myself and with others. This ‘being with’, ‘standing with’, ‘living with’ is what’s at the core of it all, what truly makes a difference to life, well-being and meaning. It’s what brings to all of us what we truly need and long for. Nothing else can offer to you what your authentic core reality does.


This is an edited version of the text in the flyer below but probably is illegible:

‘This is probably the first ever opportunity for UK body psychotherapists of all modalities and backgrounds to get together.
It will not be a formal conference with speeches, but an informal gathering including opportunities for interaction on several levels, including large group discussions, brief presentations, talking about particular themes in smaller groups, open plan networking, and a social dreaming matrix where we can pool unconscious wisdom and imagery.
The event is being offered to the body psychotherapy community as a gift by the Embodied-Relational Therapy Association (of which i am a member).
We see several ways in which it can be of value by finding out who we are. There are several organisations, but none of them include everyone, and probably many practitioners belong to none of them.So building a sense of community and solidarity between practitioners seems especially important for Body Psychotherapists, which can feel out on a limb compared with (mainstream) verbal approaches.
By finding out about the various different training and modalities, and starting greater dialogue between them we will explore whether it might be helpful to create an umbrella organisation for all UK practitioners, and if so what form this might take.
The day is open to everyone who identifies as a body psychotherapist, or as body-focused, body-centred, body-oriented, or embodied practitioner.’

This was possibly historic, gathering of practitioners and trainees from all the diverse strands of body-oriented psychotherapy in the UK. It was a potentially ground-breaking meeting as it may provide the foundations of some sort of future collective/association/body to represent this branch of psychological practice/therapy and the 90-odd year legacy of W.Reich, its founder.
I was, the sole soul, flying the flag for Integral Core Therapy and Core Energetics and Bioenergetic Analysis, its primary body-centered components. It was a good experience representing these little-known modalities in the UK; as well as citing the importance of the integral approach, of the corporeal, personal and spiritual.